Update on Money Island New Jersey

The short version: The marina is closed while we wait for specific state officials to do what they said they would do. It is taking much longer than expected but we expect eventual support.

For those who have not followed the recent history of Money Island, this is a quick summary, current as of April 9, 2019:

  1. Money Island was built on the shore of the Delaware Bay in Cumberland County, New Jersey, from the 1930s to the 1970s without any permits, surveys, licenses, etc. that leads to many regulatory compliance problems today because of the decades-old missing paperwork. We propose to address these paperwork deficiency issues with legal redevelopment that accounts for future use, higher water levels, frequent flooding, and increased wetland erosion. Research on sustainable infrastructure and restorative aquaculture is already underway here by a handful of educational and environmental groups. Meanwhile, however, permit applications to make improvements to current infrastructure have been denied and the state government recently obtained court order to shut down most existing facilities.
  2. Water level rise is a major factor in the redevelopment plans. While more water is good for the proposed future aquaculture uses, it is not good news for traditional human uses. It could also be devastating to the grass marshes that are washing away at an alarming pace. By 2050 Money Island will likely be completely underwater except for the reconstructed infrastructure designed with this expectation.
  3. Money Island is primarily a seafood landing port. In fact Money Island is New Jersey’s second most productive seafood landing port worth millions of dollars to the local economy every month in oysters, crabs, and fish. The larger regional seafood companies have proposed expanding here and are quietly acquiring more of the waterfront space. Eventually Money Island will be the primary site of the region’s expanding oyster nurseries. A growth in Delaware Bay oyster production of 1,000% to 2,000% is possible within a decade. For 2019, however, some of the smaller watermen have moved out of Money Island because the state closed their docks.
  4. The residential houses are disappearing. This is a voluntary choice of the owners based primarily on the observed effects of water level rise. Buyouts are exacerbated but not forced by government actions. Less than 10 houses are currently occupied on a regular basis. Some of the few remaining residents stay because they can’t afford to sell and relocate at the current low property values that have fallen more than 90% over the past decade. If finances were not an issue, we suspect that all residents would relocate.
  5. The recreational marina declined to such a low level of utilization in recent years that operation as a commercial entity was impossible. From 2016 to 2018 the marina averaged just one customer per day. The marina accumulated more than 10 consecutive years of financial losses and had to obtain supplemental funding by local nonprofits organizations since 2010. Despite the low usage, both public and private interests are committed to maintaining public access to the waterways here.
  6. The local government and community groups created a redevelopment strategy for the bayshore region that specifically focused on a sustainable redevelopment plan for Money Island as the region’s premier aquaculture center and seafood landing port. That plan has not yet been formally supported by state policy makers. The business of saving one storefront community for economic reasons while abandoning other communities as the water level continues to rise will continue to be politically difficult. Still, we expect that the need for seafood production increase will eventually win in this political struggle.
  7. Results of research are encouraging. We’ve shown progress on restoring species diversity, preventing erosion, rebuilding elevated infrastructure, and moving toward energy independence.
  8. The government consultant for the Money Island community recently met with high level officials at NJDEP. They report that an agreement in principal has been reached to allow proposed restorative aquaculture and sustainable redevelopment. No formal, legal and actionable steps have been taken yet.
  9. The millions of dollars of private and public funding required for permitting and rebuilding of Money Island have already been identified but all of these proposed sources are contingent on state government action. Access to redevelopment money is not expected to be a the problem in this case. Investors are actually fighting for primary positions in the redevelopment plan once it is approved.
  10. We are in a ‘waiting pattern’ for the state government action to halt current litigation over past lack of permitting that will then trigger a release of new funding to address these other issues.
  11. A book and film about Money Island will be released soon and we hope this will bring attention to our situation.

Planning for 2019 at Money Island

Looking ahead at the planned redevelopment of Money Island, we know that there will be many changes with an uncertain time frame. About half of the homes are recently removed and more will be removed in the future.

Some of the immediate changes on our campus focus on increased physical and operational security. Anyone associated with the marina in a position of handling transactions or equipment will be required to provide a background investigation report. Information will be provided on a case by case basis. Members will be provided with a bright ID tag.

The marina is currently closed for winter during this permitting phase. We do not have a reopening date, but a plan is in place to reopen Husted’s Landing Marina first, then Money Island later. Things will definitely be different here in the future and we don’t know those details yet. This list of changes will change as we get feedback from the state, developers, local government and others. But this is what we see so far for 2019:

Facilities expected to be open to members:

Beach

jetty

boat launch (defined as the concrete or gravel structures on the ground at various locations)

rafts

kayaks

boats

decks

picnic areas

nature walk areas

gardens

roadways

parking areas

refrigerator/freezer

Ice machine

Bait cooler

storage areas

recreational and commercial docks on sites not designated by the state

water service

Docks on sites not closed by the state

 

Facilities expected to be closed to all:

ramps on sites designated by the state

docks on sites designated by the state

walkways on sites designated by the state

fuel system

bathroom

Cheap dock space for larger boats

C4 and C5

We recently negotiated the availability of dock space for larger vessels at Money Island. Our largest commercial dock tenant has extra space so we agreed to make it available to others. This dock space is ideal for recreational or commercial boats not in active use, or sale, estate ownership, or repossessions.

Price: We estimate that our dock space is half the rate of Cape May New Jersey, 40 miles to our south. Our target rate is $65 per linear foot annual rate and lower short term rates as low as $35 per day are available.

Vessel Size: We can theoretically accomodate any size vessel up to 150+ feet although some modifications would be likely necessary for larger size vessels.

Depth: Greater than 12 feet at low tide.

Accommodations: Our marina is rustic and rural. Water and electric are available at some locations.

For more information: Ask for Bruce or Tony

Large vessel short term dockage

Commercial boat and yacht owners sometimes have a need for short-term vessel dockage or storage. Money Island Marina can be a perfect solution. We are located on the protected Nantuxent Cove midway between Cape May at the entrance to the Delaware Bay about 28 miles to the south and the C&D Canal about 28 miles to the north. This positioning along the intercoastal waterway puts is within easy reach of the ports of southern New Jersey resort communities, Wilmington and Philadelphia. Our rural location means that dockage prices are a small fraction of the cost of locations closer to urban centers.

The water in Nantuxent Creek is surprisingly deep; more than the 16 foot range of our depth-measuring sticks at low tide. At one time in the past the Nantuxent Creek was am important commercial port for agricultural and fisheries product that handled the largest vessels of that age. Our commercial docks can handle vessels up to 100 feet now. With advance preparation we might be able to accommodate an even larger vessel.

We are interested in arrangements with yacht brokers, finance companies, estate attorneys and others who may have a need for short-term boat storage.

Our docks offer electric, water and a full-time on-site manager. Dry dock and ramping is available. The marina sells gasoline and provides other essential services. Call Bruce or send a message for more information.

Surviving the 2016 winter

The wind this week caused some damage but overall we are still doing much better this winter than in past years. On days when the wind dies down we still get some work done at the marina. At this point in mid-January we are beginning to gain hope that we will get through the winter without any major replacements necessary.

This photo below shows ice damage from last year’s severe winter. We replaced 7 of these damaged finger docks with a stronger design and have 2 more under construction now.

ice damages docks

Despite the cold weather now, it won’t be long before reservations for our docks start heating up. Spring striper season beginning in March has been fairly successful for the the few boater who venture out in search of the migrating fish.

Call Bruce at 856-447-3576 to reserve a boat slip for the season opening on March 15.

Boat slip prices and agreement set for 2016

Miss Ocean City docked at Money Island
Miss Ocean City docked at Money Island, January 11, 2016

We just resolved the boat slip questions for 2016:

  • We lowered slip rental prices last year for 2015 to $45 per foot and the rate will remain the same for 2016. There will be a $100 surcharge for the slips with the new finger docks; we have 4 more under construction this winter. The intent is to keep the cost as low as possible for those who are price sensitive but to cover the cost of the new slips and other upgrades over time.
  • Part of D dock, near Bowen’s and away from the recreational boats, will be converted to large boat and commercial boat parallel docks. Our intent is that by removing extra recreational dock capacity we will get back to 100% recreational dock usage more quickly. The number of available slips will decrease from 64 to 45.
  • I made a physical inspection of the docks yesterday. We are in better physical shape than in any past year but will continue to work on a “punch list” of repairs. If you know of anything that needs attention on your dock, please let me know.
  • The slip rental agreement is available for download. Nothing is changed from last year except that Tony will check for and counter-sign the lease agreement before the boat comes in.
  • Please consider giving us a hand by spreading the word. We need a few more boaters who appreciate our “private bay”.
  • http://moneyislandmarina.com/boat-slips/