Storm protection improvements at Money Island Marina

IMG_0257
This photo shows new hardware and a safety chain connecting two sections of reconstructed floating dock. The safety chain bolts go through the 4″ beams of the dock below the deck. It the event of a severe storm the pin connecting the docks might break but the chain will likely survive.

Over the past 3+ years since hurricane Sandy we’re made huge progress toward improving our ability to withstand high winds, flooding and even flowing ice. You could say it’s almost been an obsession around here. Here is a partial list of our recent projects:

  • replaced high electric lighting fixtures mounted on poled with lower level more protected solar powered dock lights
  • replaced trash dumpster with “tip-proof” elevated storm proof sealed trash and recycling kiosks
  • stronger signage with plywood backing
  • use of new corrugated roofing materials and construction techniques designed to withstand 80 mph winds
  • replaced commercial port-a-potty with elevated and non-tip-able toilet
  • stainless steel cable tether lines on movable structures and equipment
  • elevated buildings
  • upgraded the water well and pump house to better withstand freezing and flooding
  • installed a water line break alarm system
  • constructed storm-roof crab shedding trays
  • replaced PVC with more flexible and freeze-proof PEX water supply lines
  • constructed an enclosed lumber yard
  • anchored buildings and floating decks to pilings with hurricane straps
  • anchored roofs to buildings with hurricane straps
  • upgraded major supporting beams from 4×4 lumber to 6×6 lumber
  • moved freezer and ice machine from outside deck to inside a closed structure
  • constructed dunes and berms
  • planted dune grass
  • encouraged growth of ground cover on empty lots so that root systems will prevent erosion
  • added rock on most vulnerable shorelines
  • entered partnership with The Nature Conservancy shoreline stabilization project.
  • Used oyster shell, conch shell and clam shell in strategic places to prevent erosion
  • Used various sized porous materials to minimize erosion from drainage in the most vulnerable spots
  • new methods to strengthen pilings and prevent erosion of poles and docks
  • added safety chains to docks
  • installed new quick-disconnect hardware on vulnerable finger docks
  • combining the use of both nails and screws for better overall strength in dock construction
  • upgraded dock hardware to 1/2″ galvanized
  • experimental use of plastic dock angle hardware for flexibility and rust resistance
  • reconstructed docks to be stronger and more resistant to flowing ice
  • replaced older pilings with stronger new poles
  • use a double system of rings plus chains to secure the most vulnerable floating docks (the transition dock near the ramp)
  • replaced older concrete septic tank lids with new sealed plastic lids
  • allow walkways and some decks to float in high water without causing damage
  • replaced storage buildings to gather and contain materials and equipment
  • in general, we don’t leave things laying around outside

Storm protection is an ongoing project for us but we feel confident that we’ve come a long way in the past three years.

 

Published by

Tony

Tony is accountant for the marina, president of BaySave Foundation and treasurer for Delaware River Greenway Partnership Inc.

Leave a Reply